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Monthly Check-In

Tuesday, December 20, 2016 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
USING PUBLIC GRAZING RECORDS TO MODEL LIVESTOCK IMPACTS AT BROAD SCALES
Adrian Monroe
 
Human land use, such as livestock grazing, can have profound yet varied impacts on wildlife within common ecosystems, yet our understanding of land-use effects is often generalized from short-term, local studies that may not correspond with trends at broader scales. Here we used public land records from 1,096 allotments to characterize livestock grazing across Wyoming,USA, and we used greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as a model organism to evaluate responses to livestock management. Based on annual counts of displaying males from 743 lek sites (2004-2014), we found sage-grouse populations may be compatible with certain combinations of grazing timing and level through enhanced reproductive success. We also found support for the hypothesis that effects of grazing management vary with local vegetation productivity. These relationships could help guide sustainable grazing in sagebrush steppe while also benefiting sage-grouse. Public grazing records also hold promise for investigating a variety of ecological and economic questions at broad spatial and temporal scales.
 
 
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Note: We do not have a recording of this presentation due to data sensitivities.