Hosting Organization:  

 

LCC

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives

a network of public-private partnerships

 

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives

Secretarial Order No. 3289 establishes Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs), a network of public-private partnerships that provide shared science to ensure the sustainability of America's land, water, wildlife and cultural resources. Protection of these resources is essential to sustaining our landscapes, quality of life, and economy. Native fish and wildlife species depend on healthy rivers, streams, wetlands, forests, grasslands and coastal areas in order to thrive, but managing these natural resources has become increasingly complex. Land use changes and events such as drought, wildfire, habitat fragmentation, contaminants, pollution, invasive species, disease, and rapid climate change can threaten human populations as well asecosystems.

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives recognize that these challenges transcend political and jurisdictional boundaries and require a more networked approach to conservation—holistic, collaborative, adaptive and grounded in science to ensure the sustainability of America's land, water, wildlife and cultural resources. As a collaborative organizaiton, LCCs seek to identify best practices, connect efforts, identify gaps, and avoid duplication through improved conservation planning and design. Partner agencies and organizations coordinate with each other while working within their existing authorities and jurisdictions.

The North Central Climate Science center will be working with Landscape Conservation Cooperatives in the following regions:

 

Great Plains

Southern Rockies

Plains & Prairie Potholes

Great Northern

Currently Participating Bureaus:

Points of Contact:

Regional Resource
Management Challenges:

  • - Biological Carbon Sequestration
  • - Climate Impacts on Agriculture and Grazing
  • - Fish and Wildlife Response to Climate Change
  • - Protection of Native American Cultural Resources
  • - Protection of Trust Species, including Migratory Waterfowl
  • - Rangeland Fire
  • - Water Availability and Water Quality for Humans and Ecosystems
  • - Wildlife Disease

Currently Participating Bureaus:

Points of Contact:

Regional Resource
Management Challenges:

  • Climate Impacts on Agriculture and Grazing
  • Fish and Wildlife Response to Climate Change
  • Forest Resilience
  • Invasive Species and Wildland Fire
  • Protection of Native American Cultural Resources
  • Protection of Trust Species
  • Renewable Energy
  • Water Availability and Water Quality for Humans and Ecosystems
  • Wildlife Recovery and Restoration

Currently Participating Bureaus:

Points of Contact:

Regional Resource
Management Challenges:

  • Biological Carbon Sequestration
  • Climate Impacts on Agriculture and Grazing
  • Geological Carbon Sequestration
  • Fish and Wildlife Response to Climate Change
  • Protection of Native American Cultural Resources
  • Protection of Trust Species, including Migratory Waterfowl
  • Rangeland Fire
  • Water Availability and Water Quality for Humans and Ecosystems
  • Wildlife Disease

Currently Participating Bureaus:

Points of Contact

Regional Resource 
Management Challenges

  • Biological Carbon Sequestration
  • Climate Impacts on Agriculture and Grazing
  • Ecosystem Restoration
  • Fish and Wildlife Response to Climate Change
  • Forest Resilience
  • Geological Carbon Sequestration
  • Glacier Retreat
  • Invasive Species
  • Protection of Native American Cultural Resources
  • Protection of Trust Species
  • Water Availability and Water Quality for Humans and Ecosystems
  • Wildland Fire